Brooke Newman
Brooke Newman brooke rae noo-mun
News Reporter, Washington, D.C.

Brooke Newman completed her bachelor’s degree in spring 2021 and expects to graduate next spring with a master’s degree in mass communication. Newman has written for The Arizona Republic, the State Press and AZBigMedia.

Latest from Brooke Newman

National park visitors – and money – are coming back after 2020 plunge

WASHINGTON - After hitting a 40-year low in the pandemic year of 2020, national park visitors - and their dollars - are steadily returning, but they are still below pre-pandemic levels, according to new National Park Service data.


Concert, theater owners call pandemic relief fund efforts a ‘disaster’

WASHINGTON - Arizona business owners said a federal program aimed at helping theaters and concert venues shuttered by COVID-19 "has been a disaster," taking until this month to deliver the first grants from a fund that was approved last year.


Hot, dry forecast offers little hope for relief as wildfires rage

WASHINGTON - A half-dozen wildfires were burning close to 140,000 acres across Arizona Tuesday and growing, as heat, wind and drought conditions complicated firefighting efforts, officials said.


Arizona plans to use gas chamber again, sparking revulsion, disbelief

WASHINGTON - Reports that Arizona is preparing to execute death row inmates with gas similar to what was used in the Holocaust have brought responses ranging from "concerned" to "horrified," but the most common reaction was disbelief.


Vaccination rates drop, but officials still hopeful state can hit goal

WASHINGTON - COVID-19 vaccination rates have fallen sharply in Arizona, but health officials are still hopeful the state can reach a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention goal of vaccinating 70% of Arizonans by July 4.


Tribal police may detain non-tribal members, Supreme Court rules

WASHINGTON - Tribal police have the authority to detain non-Natives traveling through reservation land if the officer has a reasonable belief that the suspect violated state or federal law, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.


A year after Memorial Day went virtual, in-person events welcomed back

WASHINGTON - With vaccinations rising and new COVID-19 cases falling, Memorial Day ceremonies around the state and the nation that were forced to go virtual last are scheduled to be held in person again this year - a welcome change for those who observe the day.


Celebrate holiday with a healthy dose of caution – emphasis on healthy

WASHINGTON - Arizona residents should feel comfortable celebrating Memorial Day this year, but health experts said they still need to be careful to keep from repeating last year's mistakes, when unguarded partying led to a "lethal July."


Vaccinated and restless, holiday travelers return at near-2019 levels

WASHINGTON - Travel experts say that with more people getting vaccinated and the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic easing, they expect the number of Memorial Day travelers to bounce back to almost pre-pandemic levels this holiday weekend.


Do voting laws protect or restrict access? House echoes state debate

WASHINGTON - House members stuck largely to talking points at a hearing on the effect that voter ID laws have on election access, with Republicans dismissing suggestions that they hit minority voters harder and Democrats citing a string of studies that say they do.


Election officials can fight fraud; fighting misinformation is tougher

WASHINGTON - Maricopa County's chief information security officer said the county handled cyberthreats to the 2020 elections, but handling public perception of the results in the face of rampant social media misinformation has been more of a challenge.


Over GOP objections, House OKs panel to probe Jan. 6 Capitol assault

WASHINGTON - The House voted Wednesday to create a bipartisan 9/11-style commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol, despite the opposition of 175 Republicans, including all four from Arizona.


Supreme Court to consider if two death-row inmates get new hearings

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court said it will consider whether two Arizona death-row inmates should get new hearings on claims that attorneys who represented them decades ago failed to present evidence that could have spared them.