Pac-12/SWAC Legacy Series brings social justice issues, HBCUs to the forefront

PHOENIX – Arizona and Arizona State’s basketball programs are getting a chance to learn more about historically Black colleges and universities through a partnership between the Pac-12 and the Southwestern Athletic Conference.


Hotel Heave-Ho: LA unhoused could return to streets as Project Roomkey winds down

LOS ANGELES – The L.A. Grand Hotel has housed the unsheltered under a federal grant in the name of public safety during the pandemic. Now, authorities intend to lock the door on the remaining Project Roomkey participants at two hotels by February.


Food banks get lesson in economics: More demand, less supply, higher prices

WASHINGTON – Arizona food banks head into the holiday season having to buy more food, at higher prices, for more clients, with fewer donations to help pay for it. It's a perfect storm of inflation, supply chain issues, increased demand – and a bird virus that's hit turkeys.


‘We see value in you’: Arizona organization helps bridge gaps between foster kids and families

PHOENIX – An estimated 80% of the more than 400,000 children in foster care across the U.S. struggle with significant mental health issues. In Arizona, one nonprofit is working to help children persevere – by offering services for foster youth and parents alike.

Russ Funk, left, is director of community engagement for Aid to Adoption of Special Kids in Phoenix. Funk and his wife have been foster parents, and two of their four children are adopted and biracial. “They integrated into our home at a very early age, and so it was just a natural thing,” he said, adding that those experiences are what drove him to work with other foster families. (Photo courtesy of AASK)

Appeals court gives Resolution Copper mine opponents another chance

WASHINGTON - A federal court said it will take another look at claims that the proposed Resolution Copper mine should be delayed because it sits on land sacred to the Apache and would violate their religious rights by destroying Oak Flat.


Trash talk: Los Angeles is losing its battle with litter, and neighborhoods are stepping up

LOS ANGELES – Los Angeles residents are fed up with trash they have decided to take matters into their own hands and create their own trash clubs, the city of Los Angeles, is stymied over the problem, and is heavily losing the fight against trash.

A man crushes cans and containers that can be cashed in at recycling centers. Scavengers go through some of the garbage left curbside Los Angeles. The city faces big problems of trash left on streets. (Photo by Emeril Gordon/Cronkite News)

Symptoms of COVID ‘long haulers’ baffle doctors looking for treatment options

LOS ANGELES – With COVID-19 restrictions having faded away, doctors are seeing an influx of patients with long-term symptoms that are similar to the severe symptoms shown at the peak of the pandemic but are not as lethal. Doctors and other health care providers in Southern California are working with patients to correctly diagnose them and provide proper care to ease their suffering.


Justices grapple with legality of Indian Child Welfare Act in marathon hearing

WASHINGTON - Over the course of three hours Wednesday, the Supreme Court grappled with whether a law meant to keep Indigenous children with Native American families should be overturned as racist and unconstitutional, as critics charge.


‘Visibility matters’: LGBTQ care coordinator aims to improve care for Phoenix-area veterans

PHOENIX – There are an estimated 1 million LGBTQ+ veterans in the U.S., many of whom are more likely to report chronic physical or mental health conditions. The Veterans Health Administration launched its LGBTQ+ Veteran Care Coordinator Program to address these disparities.

Ash Senter is the LGBTQ+ care coordinator at Phoenix’s Carl T. Hayden Veterans' Administration Medical Center. Senter, who is transgender and nonbinary, is a former Air Force reservist and a health psychologist who started as the Phoenix coordinator in January – and they’re excited about the changes they’ve seen. “Visibility matters,” Senter says. (Photo courtesy of Public Affairs Office/Phoenix VA)

Supreme Court lets stand ruling upholding Arizona’s eight-person juries

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear a challenge to Arizona's law that allows defendants in serious criminal cases to be tried by a jury of just eight people.


Supreme Court asked to rule ‘gold standard’ of tribal adoption laws racist

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court will consider Wednesday whether the Indian Child Welfare Act is the "gold standard" of child welfare policy or a "outrageous and unconstitutional" law that has outlived its time.


Voters with disabilities have many ways to cast ballots in Maricopa County

PHOENIX – An estimated 38 million eligible voters in the U.S. have a disability, but they tend to have a lower turnout rate than voters without disabilities. A Phoenix nonprofit works with disabled residents on what to expect on Election Day.