Tempe Juneteenth celebration combines art activism with reflections on social justice, racial equality

TEMPE – Downtown Tempe's Juneteenth Block Party, organized by the Downtown Tempe Authority, showcased Black history and social justice through interactive art, hip-hop dance battles, personalized poetry, a pop-up roller skating rink and a barber battle.

The Juneteenth Block Party at Centerpoint on Mill, in Tempe, on June 15. (Photo by Stella Subasic/Cronkite News)

How San Antonio Police lost a bullet tied to the shooting death of a baby

A new investigation by the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU reveals San Antonio police lost a bullet after logging it in as evidence in the shooting death of an 8-month old baby. The SAPD has a history of problems with evidence handling.

9mm bullets lined up in straight rows (Photo by Sonia Tapia/Getty Images)

Arizona Legislature adjourns just in time to prevent repealed 1864 abortion ban from taking effect

WASHINGTON – The Arizona Legislature adjourned just in time to prevent a legal quirk that would have briefly resurrected an 1864 near-total abortion ban that lawmakers had repealed.

The Arizona Legislature finalized the state budget and adjourned June 15, just in time to prevent the 1864 abortion ban, which it repealed, from taking effect again for a few days in September. (File photo by Ellen O’Brien/Cronkite News)

Low staffing, space crunch hobble state museum’s Native American repatriation work at UArizona

TUCSON – The Arizona State Museum holds the largest number of Indigenous remains in Arizona. But the museum has struggled to comply with a 1990 law to repatriate Native American remains and artifacts because of staffing and space shortages.

The Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona in Tucson is the oldest and largest anthropological facility in the Southwest, founded in 1893. (Photo by Christopher Lomahquahu/Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU)

Misplaced artifacts, inaccurate inventories and 2% of Native American remains returned to tribes: Inside ASU’s repatriation record

PHOENIX – Arizona State University has made under 2% of its Indigenous human remains and artifacts available to Native American tribes, one of the lowest rates in the nation, according to an analysis by Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU.

The School of Human Evolution and Social Change is the anthropological and archaeological research arm of Arizona State University. The school’s collections include Indigenous human remains and artifacts subject to repatriation under NAGPRA. (Photo by Chad Bradley/Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU)

What is the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990?

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act empowered Indigenous people to reclaim ancestors and artifacts from American museums. The 1990 law is regarded as one of the most significant Indigenous civil rights laws of the 20th century.

A special exhibit at the S’edav Va’aki Museum in Phoenix that closed in May told the story of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990, or NAGPRA. (Photo courtesy of the S’edav Va’aki Museum)

Community, healing and justice: Indigenous journalists share what reporting on repatriation meant to them

PHOENIX – Three Indigenous Cronkite reporters describe how reporting on the repatriation of Native American remains deepened their appreciation for returning ancestors home.

Cronkite News and Howard Center reporters, from left, Christopher Lomahquahu, Aspen Ford and Chad Bradley reported on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act and wrote about the experience as Indigenous journalists. (Photo by Aspen Ford/Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU)

How Cronkite News and the Howard Center reported on NAGPRA

PHOENIX – Journalists at Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism reported on how Arizona public universities have complied with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990. Here’s how they did it.

Eight graduate students reported on the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act as part of a project on the compliance records of Arizona’s flagship public universities in returning Indigenous remains and artifacts. (Photo by Madison Perales/Cronkite News and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism at ASU)

Boosting mental health through haircuts: ClipDart recreates barbershop, salon experience for Glendale older adults

GLENDALE – ClipDart is working to boost mental health for vulnerable community members through the power of quality haircuts. The nonprofit recreates an authentic barbershop and hair salon experience by bringing skilled barbers and hair stylists to people who can’t access these kinds of services.

David Rodriguez cuts Daniel Holguin’s hair, left, while Moraima Robledo gives Maria Castillo, right, a haircut at the Glendale Community Center on April 8, 2024. (Photo by Sam Ballesteros/Cronkite News)

Social equity: Critics say Arizona’s cannabis program did ‘exact opposite’ of what voters intended

PHOENIX – Arizona legalized recreational marijuana and established a social equity ownership program. Critics say the state failed to establish a fair program. We explain how it happened.

Alicia Deals, left, checks in on her colleague, who goes by K.T., while he sorts and packs online orders, on June 3, 2024, at the Cookies dispensary in Tempe. (Photo by Stella Subasic/Cronkite News)

In rare bipartisan agreement, House and Senate push to lift ban on felons with drug-related convictions receiving SNAP benefits

WASHINGTON — The Farm Bill advancing in the U.S. House would lift the 28-year ban on felons with drug-related convictions receiving SNAP benefits. Ex-offenders and prison advocates say this will make rehabilitation and returning to life after incarceration easier.

The number of Arizonans in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – or food stamps – surged in the past year, as the pandemic hit the economy. But a new report says not everyone eligible for SNAP is able to access the system, and advocates worry that may still be happening despite increasing need. (Photo by USDA/Creative Commons)

Supreme Court dashes Arizona death row inmate’s hope to avoid death penalty in 1992 double murder

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that Danny Lee Jones, on Arizona death row since 1993, won’t be resentenced despite claims his lawyer didn’t do enough to win sympathy at sentencing.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that Danny Lee Jones, on Arizona death row since 1993, won’t be resentenced despite claims his lawyer didn’t do enough to win sympathy at sentencing. (File photo by Haley Smilow/Cronkite News)