Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs creates independent prison oversight commission

PHOENIX - Arizona Gov. Katie Hobbs signed her sixth executive order Wednesday, establishing an independent prison oversight commission to improve the transparency and accountability of Arizona’s corrections system.


‘We were always sovereign’: Hia-Ced O’odham seek federal recognition as a tribe

PHOENIX – In Arizona, 22 federally recognized tribes inhabit nearly every region of the state, but the Hia-Ced O’odham community isn’t one of them. Some members are working to change that, and others believe it may be too difficult to achieve.

Lourdes “Lulu” Pereira is a student worker at the Labriola Center and the official archivist for the Hia-Ced Hemajkam LLC, which was established in 2015 to work toward federal recognition and reclamation of ancestral lands. Photo taken Dec. 1, 2022, at Hayden Library in Tempe. (Photo by Campbell Wilmot/Cronkite News)

Jury convicts Arizona Oath Keeper of seditious conspiracy in Jan. 6 attack

WASHINGTON - An Arizona man charged with seditious conspiracy in the Jan. 6 insurrection thought he was supporting peaceful protesters, his attorney argued Wednesday, but prosecutors said Edward Vallejo was played an essential role in the Oath Keepers' attack on the Capitol.


Representation on police force builds trust with LGBTQ people

Greg Miraglia, founder of Out to Protect, said training, recruitment and officer representation on a police force are among the ways to build trust with LGBTQ community people.


Arizona led nation for rise in homeless youth last year, HUD report says

WASHINGTON - Arizona saw the largest increase in the number of homeless youth in the nation last year, at a time when other large states were seeing those numbers decline, according to a recent federal report.


Police in Colorado town use outreach, TikTok to gain immigrants’ trust

AVON, Colorado – Avon Police Chief Greg Daly says many people in his small Rocky Mountain town are afraid to call police. To improve trust among the large immigrant population, the department conducts an annual Latino Police Academy, has hired more Spanish-speaking officers and even posts fun TikToks in Spanish.

Detective Alan Hernandez of the Avon Police Department uses his experience to connect with the small Colorado city’s large immigrant community. Photo taken in July 2022. (Photo by Gabriela Tumani/News21)

As more LGBTQ+ people face eating disorders, providers work to create appropriate care

PHOENIX – With research showing that LGBTQ+ individuals face a higher risk of developing eating disorders, more and more providers are creating specialized treatment to address these disparities and ensure people get the care they need.


Colonias residents fight long, and often lonely, fight for basic services

EL PASO COUNTY, Tex. - More than 134,000 residents to colonias - unincorporated rural communities along the U.S.-Mexico border - live withough basic services like roads, water or sewer, and the fight to change that is long and lonely, often left to residents and private nonprofits.


‘It’s changing’: As police officers quit the profession in droves, an opportunity for change emerges

PHOENIX – Police departments across the country are in a workforce crisis. Some leaders see this as an opportunity, and they’re trying harder to attract candidates who reflect the communities they serve, with a focus on women, people of color and members of the LGBTQ+ community.

Officer Ashten Hayes of the Iowa City Police Department checks her patrol car's computer before her shift begins on April 18, 2022. After going to school for nursing, Hayes switched career paths to law enforcement "because I saw law enforcement as a noble job.” (Photo by Kate Heston/News21)

Fighting hate: Approaches range from expanding hate crime definitions to gathering data

LOS ANGELES – The system for reporting hate in America is broken. The FBI’s database has limited scope, and people often don’t – or sometimes can’t – report hate crimes to authorities. But federal, state and local entities are tackling hate in a variety of ways – from expanding definitions and launching hotlines to capturing data.

A chalkboard filled with drawings of staff and a large rainbow hangs near the front desk at the TransLatin@ Coalition office in Los Angeles on July 5, 2022. Jimena Sandoval, the group’s communications and marketing coordinator, says it was drawn for Pride Month. (Photo by Jessica Alvarado Gamez/News21)

Statewide hotline to support mental health during and after pregnancy

TUCSON – A hotline expected to launch next spring seeks to help improve access to information and treatment options for perinatal mental health.

Allison, who asked that only her first name be used because of concerns about mental health stigma, sits in front of her home in Tucson on Nov. 3, 2022. Diagnosed with bipolar disorder at age 18, Allison sought help from a perinatal psychiatrist when she decided to start a family. A new statewide hotline aims to help more people like her. (Photo by Laura Bargfeld/Cronkite News)

Border communities, Border Patrol brace for migrant surge as Title 42 ends

TUCSON - Record-high numbers of migrants stressed humanitarian organizations and border officials alike in 2022. Now, both groups are bracing for a new surge, with the end next week of Title 42, a pandemic-era rule that allowed 2.5 million migrants to be turned away.