Emma VandenEinde
Emma VandenEinde EH-muh VAN-din-ine-dee (she/her/hers)
News Reporter, Phoenix

Emma VandenEinde expects to graduate in May 2022 with a master’s degree in journalism. VandenEinde, who has reported for KJZZ, produced for Arizona PBS and edited ASU Thrive, is working for the Phoenix news bureau.

Latest from Emma Vandeneinde

‘What is your climate future?’ How tarot card readings could ease ‘eco-anxiety’

Artist and Arizona State University professor Adriene Jenik thought giving tarot card readings on climate change was “nutty.” But scientists supported her, and now she’s given thousands of ECOtarot readings all over the world to address eco-anxiety.


Can a MechanicalTree remove enough carbon to slow climate change?

TEMPE – Engineers at Arizona State University have worked on a MechanicalTree that passively collects and repurposes carbon from the atmosphere. With carbon emissions continuing to rise, they view this tree as a potential solution to slow climate change.


Maya’s Farm first to be saved by Phoenix Farmland Preservation Program

PHOENIX – Three years ago, Maya Dailey risked losing the urban farmland she had spent seven years renting and cultivating. A conservation easement through Phoenix’s new Farmland Preservation Program, managed by the Central Arizona Land Trust, saved Maya’s Farm.


Ukrainian official details horrors of Russian invasion, asks Arizona lawmakers for help

PHOENIX – Dmytro Kushneruk, the consul general of Ukraine in San Francisco, detailed the horrors of war in Ukraine and asked for assistance for citizens of the country during a special joint session of the Arizona Legislature.


Could mechanical “trees” remove enough carbon to slow climate change?

Engineers at Arizona State University have designed a model “tree” that will passively collect and repurpose carbon from the atmosphere. With carbon emissions on the rise, they view this tree as a solution to slow climate change. Yet, many trees would be needed to make a difference.


Green certification available for sustainable landscapes

Outdoor spaces can be certified as sustainable under the SITES program. California,Texas and other states have been quick to adopt the standards, but Arizona has shied away from them. ASU is an exception.


Some Arizona downwinders who blame illnesses on nuclear testing remain uncompensated

KINGMAN – Residents in lower Mohave County who attribute their illnesses to the nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site continue to be left out of RECA compensation. New legislation is being introduced to include them in the compensation.


Discovery of Pluto at Flagstaff observatory continues to inspire 92 years later

FLAGSTAFF – The Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff celebrated the 92nd anniversary of astronomer Clyde Tombaugh’s discovery of Pluto, which now is designated a dwarf planet.


UArizona scientists learn how plants communicate

Scientists at the University of Arizona are testing how plants respond to their environment.


Crop talk: UArizona scientists learning how plants communicate with their environment

TUCSON – Scientists at the University of Arizona are testing how plants respond to their environment. Their goal is to engineer plants so they can withstand the effects of climate change.


Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project projected to serve thousands of people

PHOENIX – The ongoing project aims to bring drinking water to the Navajo Nation, the Jicarilla Apache Nation and Gallup, New Mexico. Some residents have received water while others are still waiting.


Arizona State theater group is taking climate change to the stage

TEMPE – Scientists and climate experts are trying to find new ways to help people understand the impact of climate change. Instead of a bulleted presentation, some of them are turning to a different medium – the theater.


Arizona farmer struggles with water shortage, thinks about selling her family’s land

CASA GRANDE — Arizona rivers and reservoirs saw record low water levels last year as megadrought and rising temperatures continue. The forecast for 2022 isn’t much better.


Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project promises water to thousands

The ongoing project aims to bring drinking water to the Navajo Nation, the Jicarilla Apache Nation and Gallup, New Mexico. Some residents have received water while others are still waiting.


With rising COVID cases, advice on how to stay safe during the holidays

The executive director of Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute urges caution around holiday gatherings as COVID cases continue to increase.

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Why Verde River sediment reduces water storage capacity

Sediment in the Verde River continues to pile up behind Horseshoe Dam north of Cave Creek, reducing the amount of water the reservoir can store. Water experts are considering raising the height of Bartlett Dam, which is further downstream, as a possible solution.

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The pandemic blew up home gardening, but will the trend wither on the vine?

PHOENIX – The COVID-19 pandemic prompted Americans to take on new hobbies. Gardening was one of the hottest trends of the year.


Great American Seed Up promotes seed regeneration in Phoenix communities

Across the nation, many people flocked to gardening as a way to stay busy and grow food during the COVID lockdown. As the world starts to adjust back to normal, local seed groups and urban farm partners are finding ways to encourage sustainable seed preservation in the community.


Arizona Supreme Court unanimously rules the legislature violated the state’s constitution

Within two hours of hearing arguments, justices on the Arizona Supreme Court agreed that the legislature violated the state’s constitution by including new laws that ban masks in schools.


Persistent drought expected for Arizona

The headline from NOAA, and climate researchers is that the Southwest is still experiencing drought conditions which will persist in coming months.


Arizona farmer faces water shortage, struggles to grow crops amid drought

Nancy Caywood has worked on her grandfather’s farm in Pinal County since she was young. She should have a full field of alfalfa, but since the San Carlos Irrigation District shut off her water due to the drought, her fields are empty and dry.


Tucson Police Chief Chris Mangus finally gets Senate confirmation hearing for CBP post

The nomination of Chief Chris Magnus to be commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection got its first hearing.


New tool monitors water loss across the West

NASA launched a new program called OpenET and it monitors the loss of water across the western U.S.

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Pinal County farmer struggles to grow crops with less water

CASA GRANDE – Nancy Caywood should have a full field of alfalfa now, but since the San Carlos Irrigation District shut off her water because of drought, her fields are empty and dry.


This succulent found in Arizona is extremely rare, listed as ‘threatened’

Bartram’s stonecrop, a succulent that’s found in the Santa Rita Mountains in southern Arizona and northern Mexico, is being listed as a "threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act, which will give it certain protections, starting Sept. 30.


New estimates show Colorado River levels falling faster than expected

New projections show that Lake Mead and Lake Powell could reach "critically low reservoir elevations" sooner than expected, spurring experts to say that "bold actions" will be needed to change course.


Succulent in Arizona’s sky islands listed as ‘threatened’ under Endangered Species Act

Bartram’s stonecrop is a rare succulent native to southern Arizona and northern Mexico. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will officially list it as threatened under the Endangered Species Act this week.


Maricopa election probe is complete, but fight may just be starting

WASHINGTON - After months of work and millions of dollars, the contractors investigating Maricopa County's elections were able to answer one question Friday - President Joe Biden did win. Otherwise, they spent hours raising questions and calling for more investigation.


New estimates show Colorado River levels falling faster than expected

WASHINGTON - New projections show that Lake Mead and Lake Powell could reach "critically low reservoir elevations" sooner than expected, spurring experts to say that "bold actions" will be needed to change course.


Climate advocates, lawmaker urge Sens. Sinema and Kelly to support Biden budget plan

PHOENIX – Arizona’s senators are being urged to support the “Build Back Better” budget to provide funding for clean energy initiatives and jobs to address the effects of climate change as extreme heat becomes more common.


ASU professor uses art to educate Latinx community about COVID

PHOENIX – An Arizona researcher is blending research and art to help educate the Latinx community about COVID-19.


House OKs bills easing path to citizenship for undocumented residents

WASHINGTON - The House passed a pair of bills Thursday that would provide a path to citizenship for Dreamers and legal status to undocumented farmworkers.


Dreamers in Arizona have mixed feelings about Biden’s immigration plan

PHOENIX – Recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program have mixed feelings about the immigration plan outlined by President Joe Biden.