Justice

McSally says she was raped in military, ‘horrified’ by Air Force’s response

WASHINGTON - Sen. Martha McSally, R-Arizona, revealed during a hearing on sexual assault in the miltary that she was raped by a superior officer while in the Air Force but was too "ashamed and confused" to report it, and that when she tried to report it years later she was "horrified" by tthe reponse.

Background-check bill passes, splitting House and Arizona delegation

WASHINGTON - Arizona lawmakers voted along party lines as Democrats pushed one of their top priorities through the House, advancing a bill to strengthen background checks on gun transfers.But the Bipartisan Background Check Act of 2019 ix expected to face a ttoughher fight in the Senate.

Giffords, Democrats rally at Capitol for gun background-check bill

WASHINGTON - Former Arizona Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords rallied House lawmakers to support a bill that would expand the requirement for background checks on private gun sales, a bill critics charge is "well intentioned, but will not solve the problem" of gun violence.

As fentanyl seizures rise, so do safety concerns around the deadly drug

WASHINGTON - Fentanyl seizures are just a fraction of total drug seizures in the country, but it is one of the deadliest drugs, with as little as 2 milligrams being a potentially fatal dose. That's raised alarms as Customs and Border Protection officers seized a record 254 pounds in Nogales in January.

Sinema joins GOP, two Democrats, to confirm Barr as attorney general

WASHINGTON - Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema was one of just three Democrats who crossed party lines and voted to confirm William Barr as attorney general, despite critics' concerns that Barr might not defend probes of the Trump administration. Sen. Martha McSally, R-Arizona, also voted for Barr.

Arizona high court hears appeal of Phoenix law protecting LGBT rights

PHOENIX – The Arizona Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday over the non-discrimination ordinance Phoenix approved in 2013 to protect the rights of gay Americans. The Christian owners of a calligraphy studio argue the law violates their rights to free speech and religion.