Alyssa Marksz
Alyssa Marksz uh-lih-suh marks (she/her/hers)
News Reporter, Washington, D.C.

Alyssa Marksz expects to graduate in May 2023 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communication and minors in Spanish and voice performance. Marksz is a digital reporter for Cronkite News in Washington, D.C., this summer.

Latest from Alyssa Marksz

Justice Department issues clearest warning yet on Arizona election audit

WASHINGTON - The Justice Department issued guidance Wednesday on voting rights and on the pitfalls of post-election audits, reminders that were sent to all states but clearly aimed at Arizona and its audit of Maricopa County elections.


As cops testify on Capitol attacks, GOP lawmakers blast ‘sham’ inquiry

WASHINGTON - Police officers gave hours of emotional testimony about being on the front lines at the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, while separate groups of GOP lawmakers attacked the Tuesday hearings as a sham and defended the rioters as "political prisoners."


DACA recipients’ future uncertain – again – after latest court ruling

WASHINGTON - A federal judge's ruling that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is unlawful should have no practical impact on more than 600,000 covered immigrants for now - but it is sure to have an emotional impact, advocates say.


Border encounters surge, as migrants make repeated crossing attempts

WASHINGTON - The number of migrants stopped at the Southwest border continued to surge last month, to the highest level for June in at least 20 years, but officials caution that those numbers could have been inflated by repeat attempts by the same people.


Flake a ‘risky’ pick as Turkish ambassador, but likely to be confirmed

WASHINGTON - Former Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, a Republican never-Trumper with no formal diplomatic experience, was a "risky" pick by President Joe Biden to be ambassador to Turkey, but analysts said he is still likely to win confirmation by the Senate.


Migrant deaths in the desert at record levels as heat wave pounds West

WASHINGTON - The number of migrant deaths recorded in the Arizona desert so far this year is on pace to break the record set just last year, as migrants attempt the crossing in the face of a record-breaking heat wave.


Lucky sucker: Endangered fish’s status improving; critics not so sure

WASHINGTON - Federal officials said the endangered razorback sucker has made enough of a comeback that it is time for the status of the Colorado River fish to be upgraded from endangered to threatened.


Fireworks still on tap despite ‘crazy hot, potentially dry’ July 4th

WASHINGTON - With the pandemic winding down, cities and towns across the state are looking toward a more typical Fourth of July this year - and typical in Arizona means balancing the desire for fireworks against the potential for wildfire.


Supreme Court ruling in Arizona case expected to have national impact

WASHINGTON - Both sides in the election law debate agree on at least one thing: The Supreme Court's expected ruling Thursday in an Arizona election law case will be felt well beyond the state's borders.


Border Patrol chief out, as White House grapples with immigration

WASHINGTON - The chief of Border Patrol was forced out this week after just 17 months in the job, a move that critics blasted as a politically motivated decision by the Biden administration.


Navajo have COVID-19 under control, but still leery of Delta variant

WASHINGTON - The Navajo Nation has yet to record a single case of the Delta variant of COVID-19, but now is not the time for tribe members to let down their guard, Navajo President Jonathan Nez said Wednesday.


Arizona kids’ health, schooling fare poorly – again – in annual report

WASHINGTON - Despite gains in some areas, Arizona continued to rank among the worst states in the nation for education, according to the latest version of a national report that measures children's wellbeing across several areas.

Clarendon Elementary School photo

Border officials eye Monday reopening to nonessential travel with hope

WASHINGTON - Border officials urged lawmakers to stick to a plan to reopen the border to nonessential travel Monday, even as they said more needs to be done to prepare for the expected surge in traffic.


Transitioning from coal is the goal – how to get there is the question

WASHINGTON – Navajo and Hopi witnesses agreed the region needs to move away from its economic dependence on coal, but specific proposals on how to get there remained elusive after a House hearing Tuesday.


Tucson halts operations at water plant threatened by toxic chemical

WASHINGTON - Tucson officials said they will indefinitely suspend operations at one of the city's water treatment plants to keep it from being overwhelmed by an underground toxic chemical plume.


Cities wait, worry over state budget that poses ‘huge hit’ to revenues

WASHINGTON - With less than four weeks remaining in this fiscal year, local governments in Arizona are anxiously watching state budget negotiations that they fear could end up delivering a "huge hit" to city and town finances.


Uber, DoorDash settle state claim, end breaks for Black businesses

WASHINGTON - Uber Eats, Postmates and DoorDash said they will no longer waive delivery fees for customers who order from Black-owned restaurants in Arizona, to settle charges by the state that the deals violated the Arizona Civil Rights Act.


Biden’s ambitious higher cap on refugee admissions unlikely to be met

WASHINGTON - Both sides agree on one thing about President Joe Biden's decision to raise this year's cap on refugee admissions from a historic low of 15,000 to as many as 62,500 - the U.S. is not going to come close to hitting that new ceiling.


Vet touts Arizona efforts to help veterans get jobs, despite COVID-19

WASHINGTON - A employment program for veterans that began in the days after 9/11 paid off last year when the COVID-19 pandemic rattled employment for vets in the state and across the country, an advocate told House lawmakers Wednesday.


Arizona’s current historic drought may be ‘baseline for the future’

WASHINGTON - Arizona and other Western states just lived through the driest year in more than a century, with no drought relief in sight in the near future, experts told a House panel Tuesday.


Supreme Court to consider if two death-row inmates get new hearings

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court said it will consider whether two Arizona death-row inmates should get new hearings on claims that attorneys who represented them decades ago failed to present evidence that could have spared them.