Luke Simmons

Luke Simmons

News Visual Journalist, Phoenix

Luke Simmons of Georgia is pursuing a master’s degree in mass communication with a focus in health reporting. After earning a degree in international affairs from the University of Georgia in 2015, he joined the Peace Corps and served as an agroforestry volunteer in Guinea.

Latest from Luke Simmons

Each Election Day, voters with disabilities combat barriers to cast ballots

PHOENIX – Some 38 million people with disabilities were eligible to vote in this year’s election, but they face unique challenges in ensuring their ballots get cast and counted.


Election updates: Voters defy COVID, misgivings to make their voices heard

Millions of Arizona residents have already voted in this swing state but people are showing up in person at polls around Arizona to vote for President Trump or Joe Biden for president, for or against Proposition 207 to legalize recreational marijuana and Prop 208 to fund education.


Black advocates spotlight uneven rates of food allergies in children

Across the U.S., Black advocates are working to combat food allergy disparities in children of color and push for action to help.


Glendale homeowners association orders removal of Black Lives Matter sign

GLENDALE – A Glendale HOA sent a violation notice to a homeowner for displaying a Black Lives Matter flag on her home, raising questions about the power of HOAs to dictate political expression.


Navajo drives unite two goals: COVID-19 relief and upping census participation

The Navajo Nation is holding relief drives across the reservation to gather COVID relief supplies and signing residents up for the census.


As polls show him trailing in Arizona, Trump stops in Phoenix to woo Latino voters

PHOENIX – In a matter of days, both the Trump and Biden campaigns have sought to win over a key demographic that could make or break the November election: Hispanic voters.


Nicaraguans seek refuge in Panama, cementing the country’s status as migrant destination

PANAMA CITY, Panama – Nicaraguans fleeing political and economic conditions in their country are moving south to Panama, against the normal tide of immigration in the hemisphere.


Ahead of ‘public charge’ change, advocates struggle to keep Hispanic families enrolled in benefits

PHOENIX – Advocates continue struggling to keep qualified Hispanic families enrolled in public programs like food stamps and cash assistance amid changes to the so-called public charge rule. The U.S. Supreme Court last month decided to let the rule take effect, and that happens on Feb. 24. It allows immigration officers to consider applicants’ use of public benefits, including Medicaid, in deciding to grant green cards, visas and changes in residency.