Calah Schlabach

Calah Schlabach

News Reporter, Washington, D.C.

Calah Schlabach is a multimedia storyteller pursuing a master’s degree in mass communication. She has been a graduate assistant for Global Sport Matters and a 2020 News21 fellow. Schlabach was a grant writer for a social services nonprofit and has written and copy editied in Vietnam and Haiti.

Latest from Calah Schlabach

Court: Mailed Navajo ballots should not get extra time to be counted

WASHINGTON - Native Americans may face barriers to voting in general, but that is not enough to require that ballots mailed from the Navajo Nation get 10 extra days to be counted, a federal appeals court said Thursday.


State, tribal leaders condemn use of force against border protesters

WASHINGTON - Tohono O'odham and congressional officials are condemning the "utterly shameful" use of tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse a small group of people during a peaceful border wall protest Monday near Ajo.


Arizona faces back-to-back court hearings with weeks to Election Day

WASHINGTON - The road to the ballot box in Arizona apparently runs through the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which heard two cases in just the past two days concerning ballots and voter registration in the state.


Goodbye, Columbus?: Arizona celebrates first Indigenous Peoples’ Day

WASHINGTON - After years of advocacy by tribal groups, Arizona on Monday celebrated its first Indigenous Peoples' Day, but the proclamation designating the day was just for this year and it still shared the calendar with Columbus Day.


Court blocks order giving voters more time to fix unsigned mail ballots

WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court Tuesday temporarily blocked a lower court ruling that would have given Arizona voters five days past Election Day to fix early ballots that were accidentally filed without a signature.


Supreme Court to review Arizona voting laws overturned as discriminatory

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Friday said it would hear Arizona's defense of two election laws, on ballot-collecting and out-of-precinct voting, that were struck down by a lower court earlier this year as racially discriminatory.


Hopi leader: Congress must act to save ‘life changing’ diabetes program

WASHINGTON - A "life-changing" diabetes program for Native Americans will expire Dec. 11 if Congress doesn't take action, a move that Hopi Chairman Timothy Nuvangyaoma said it is "critical" for tribes across the nation, including his.


Action on missing, murdered women legislation caps years of advocacy

WASHINGTON - Native American advocates and families have worked for years to draw attention to Indian Country's epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women. The federal government finally passed legislation that could help do something about it.


From showdown to stalemate, Pascua Yaqui voting site feud continues

WASHINGTON - What was a showdown between the Pascua Yaqui tribe, the Pima County Board of Supervisors and the county's recorder has now turned into a stalemate after the board voted to OK an emergency voting site on tribal land and the recorder refused.


System could help tribal members past – one – voter registration hurdle

WASHINGTON - Advocates said a new policy that lets Arizona residents without traditional street addresses register to vote online is not perfect - but it's a vast improvement over the old process.


Critics: Feds reopened tribal schools without asking or advising tribes

WASHINGTON - Lawmakers and tribal leaders berated the Bureau of Indian Education on Thursday for a school reopening plan that prioritizes in-person learning, despite tribes' opposition to the plan in the face of COVID-19 health concerns.


Tribe renews voting site push, sets up showdown with Pima recorder

WASHINGTON - At least two Pima County supervisors will "press forward" to get an early voting site reinstated on the Pascua-Yaqui reservation, setting up a showdown with the county recorder who rejected the request again this week.


Rio Salado restoration efforts get boost with federal ‘partnership’ designation

WASHINGTON - Federal officials on Tuesday named a 58-mile stretch of the Lower Salt and Gila rivers an Urban Waters Federal Partnership location, a designation that could bring millions in funding to efforts to revitalize the stressed Valley waterway.


Appeals exhausted, Navajo double-killer executed despite tribe’s objections

WASHINGTON - Lezmond Mitchell on Wednesday became the first Native American in modern history to be executed by the federal government over the objections of a tribal government for a crime committed between Native Americans on tribal land.


Navajo on death row faces execution Wednesday, barring last-minute action

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court late Tuesday rejected a petition to delay the execution of Lezmond Mitchell, a Navajo on federal death row who is scheduled to be put to death Wednesday evening for the murders of a Navajo woman and her granddaughter.

prison cell block and bars