Social Justice

Another Hill to climb: Obscure law denies Dreamers congressional jobs

WASHINGTON - One benefit of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is work authorization, but it does not extend to Capitol Hill - a surprise to some Arizona Democrats who, barred from hiring Dreamers, are now trying to change the law.


Diamond in the rough: Japanese Americans imprisoned at Arizona camps during WWII found solace in baseball

PHOENIX – Baseball served as a distraction for some Japanese Americans who were imprisoned at Arizona camps during WWII


5 transgender military veterans discuss abuses, how political changes can alter lives

PHOENIX – Transgender military veterans have faced a constant shift in policy, depending on which party is in power. Five of them talk to Cronkite News about their experiences.


Wildfire prevention gets boost from behind bars with expanded program

WASHINGTON - It's important to have boots on the ground when battling wildfires, and state officials will soon be able to put 1,400 more boots on the ground - in the form of up to 700 prison inmates, who will be used to do forest maintenance under a new law.


Fight over Oak Flat mine draws support of diverse religious groups

WASHINGTON - The Oak Flat copper mine battle has gone from an environmental to a religious fight, with groups ranging from the Sikh Coalition to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints backing a White Mountain Apache claim that the mine will destroy sacred lands.


A Community’s Response: Reflections from the White Mountain Apache Tribe a year into the COVID-19 pandemic

WHITERIVER – COVID-19 devastated Native American communities. With the spotlight often on places like the Navajo Nation, the much smaller White Mountain Apache Tribe quietly battled to save its people.


Why this ‘radical librarian’ believes libraries, to address inequity, should keep buildings closed

Fobazi Ettarh believes reopening in-building library services to the public highlights disparities between the less fortunate and the well-off. Ettarch says it’s best to keep libraries closed to force a long-term solution.


With drug overdoses rising, leaders take action

PHOENIX – Amid record overdose deaths in the U.S., policymakers are proposing measures to expand treatment, reduce the chance of overdose and direct more funding to the problem.


‘I instantly knew he was dead’: Drug overdoses surge during pandemic, piling tragedy upon tragedy

TUCSON – While stay-at-home orders kept people safe from contracting COVID-19, home is where isolation and limited access to treatment fueled substance use disorders and led to a spike in overdose deaths.


Arizona near top of states for bills aimed at voting rights, limits

WASHINGTON - Arizona lawmakers began the year with the third-highest number of voting restriction bills in the nation, but it appears only a few will survive as the Legislature winds down. But voting rights activists say those few bills will still disenfranchise minority voters.


Relief, but a vow to fight on: Arizonans react to Chauvin convictions

PHOENIX – The excruciating video of George Floyd’s murder last year led to three guilty verdicts Tuesday against Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes, 46 seconds, galvanizing a global battle against police violence toward Black people.


ASU professor uses art to educate Latinx community about COVID

PHOENIX – An Arizona researcher is blending research and art to help educate the Latinx community about COVID-19.