Politics

Navajo council votes to oppose possible HUD limits on home-loan program

WASHINGTON - The Navajo Nation Council voted unanimously Thursday to oppose a HUD draft plan that critics say could put income restrictions for the first time on applicants to the Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program, but which HUD says has been misinterpreted.


New rules expand hunting on most national wildlife refuges in Arizona

WASHINGTON - Hunting groups are applauding new federal rules that create longer seasons, extend hours and expand methods for hunting and taking different types of game on 1.4 millino acres of national wildlife refuges.- more than half of that land in Arizona.


March for Our Lives Arizona steps into gun violence fray in communities of color

PHOENIX – Congressional candidates and members of the Arizona Legislature spoke at a town hall about gun reform organized by 17-year-old Genesis Rivas, director of special projects for March for Our Lives Arizona.


Yuma border projects get Pentagon funding, as Fort Huachuca takes a hit

WASHINGTON - Border construction near Yuma will receive almost $1.3 billion of the $3.6 billion the Defense Department said it will divert from other planned military projects - including $30 million from a project that had been scheduled for Fort Huachuca.


Arizona to get $20 million of $1.8 billion fed fund to fight opioids

WASHINGTON - Arizona will get more than $20 million in State Opioid Response grant funds from the federal government, part of $1.8 billion in grants the Trump administration said it was releasing to states Wednesday.

opioids

12 Valley police agencies join program linking to video-doorbell owners

WASHINGTON - A dozen Valley police departments are among 400 in the U.S. partnering with video-doorbell maker Ring to connect police and local homeowners who use the company's technology, raising concerns among some privacy advocates. But police say the program is safe and helps solve crime.


State boards waste little time approving professional licenses under new law

WASHINGTON - The state is already approving licenses under a new law that requires most professional licensing boards and commissions to accept valid out-of-state licenses, avoiding the cost and hassle of training and testing for an Arizona license to do what they already know how to do.


Arizona officials fear fallout as new tariffs on Chinese goods start

WASHINGTON - Arizona business leaders said they worry that a 15% tariff on $300 billion in Chinese goods that takes effect Sunday will backfire and end up hurting economic growth at home. The new tariffs target consumer and electronic goods heading into the holiday season.


Deadlines loom for Navajo looking to take part in land buy-back program

WASHINGTON - Time is running out for Navajo landowners who want to take part in the second round of a $1.9 billion federal program to buy back scattered and isolated parcels of land on the Navajo Nation. Friday is the last dayNew Mexico residents to apply while those in Arizona and Utah have until Sept. 30.


The tough gets tougher: McSally again faces primary race in Senate bid

WASHINGTON - Arizona's Senate race, already expected to be one of the toughest in the nation, got tougher this week when Phoenix businessman Daniel McCarthy announced a Republican primary challenge to incumbent Sen. Martha McSally in her 2020 re-election bid.


Rosemont copper mine suffers another setback in decade of legal battles

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers suspended a Clean Water Act permit for the proposed Rosemont copper mine site in southern Arizona, the latest development in more than a decade of legal challenges from tribes and environmental groups.


Experts: $20 million for school suicide prevention welcome, more needed

WASHINGTON - Education and government officials called a $20 million grant for suicide prevention programs in Arizona schools an important first step to deal with a growing problem, even as they said much more needs to be done.