Search result for Nathan J. Fish

Plumbing the Rockies: Vast infrastructure gets water where it’s needed

In Colorado, most of the water is in the western part of the state, but 80% of residents live east of the Rocky Mountains. A complex network of tunnels and canals supplies those cities, but is that system still viable in a warming, drying West?


Navajo officials confident about reopening amid spread of delta variant in U.S.

PHOENIX – Cases of the delta variant are rising in the U.S., but the tribe’s president and officials with the Navajo Department of Health express confidence about reopening the reservation at 50%.


Lucky sucker: Endangered fish’s status improving; critics not so sure

WASHINGTON - Federal officials said the endangered razorback sucker has made enough of a comeback that it is time for the status of the Colorado River fish to be upgraded from endangered to threatened.


‘You feel like you can’t get a break’: The Colorado River struggles to water the West after two decades of drought

After another dry year, the waterway that supplies 40 million people is parched as climate change upends the water cycle in the Southwest. Scientists say the only way forward is to rein in demands on the 1,450-mile long Colorado River’s water to match its decline.


Black-footed ferret on the way back, but hurdles remain, experts say

WASHINGTON - Federal officials want to greatly expand habitats for black-footed ferrets in Arizona and possibly into neighboring states, but the endangered animal, once thought extinct, still faces several hurdles, experts say.


After the flames: Santa Catalina Mountains rebounding from Bighorn Fire a year ago

TUCSON – A year later, plants and wildlife are returning to the Santa Catalina Mountains after one of the state’s largest wildfires destroyed nearly 120,000 acres.


Advocates blast Supreme Court decision upholding Arizona election laws

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court Thursday rejected claims that Arizona's ballot-harvesting and out-of-precinct election rules discriminate against minority voters, a ruling that one critic said "takes a sledgehammer" to equal voting protections.


Could sports gambling be boon for women’s sports? Bet on it, some say

PHOENIX – As sports betting becomes legal across the United States, some see potential for an increase in attention on women’s sports because bettors might feel invested. Others aren’t so sure. Either way, both industries are taking off and they’re doing it together.


Navajo have COVID-19 under control, but still leery of Delta variant

WASHINGTON - The Navajo Nation has yet to record a single case of the Delta variant of COVID-19, but now is not the time for tribe members to let down their guard, Navajo President Jonathan Nez said Wednesday.


From doughnuts to cash to … pot? Incentives rise as vaccination rates slide

MESA – With vaccination rates declining, public and private entities are trying to reverse the trend. From free doughnuts to cold, hard cash, individuals stepping up to get pricked can be rewarded in many ways.


Western states looking closely at water supplies, including some duck ponds in Colorado

Water supplies are so tight in the West that many states keep close watch over every creek, river, ditch and reservoir. A complex web of laws and rules makes sure water is put to use. To prevent any waste, Colorado has started cracking down on what may seem like a drop in the proverbial bucket.


Citing physiological benefits, experts say Coyotes shouldn’t lose sleep over move to Central Division

PHOENIX – The Coyotes are moving to the Central Division next season and will face teams who are much further east. Although the move may seem unintuitive to fans, academic research indicates that the Coyotes’ divisional opponents may be at a physical disadvantage when traveling to Gila River Arena.