Anthony J. Wallace

Anthony J. Wallace

News Reporter, Phoenix

Anthony Wallace is an Arizona native who expects to graduate in December 2020 with a master’s degree in journalism. His work has appeared in Phoenix New Times, Phoenix Magazine and the New Humanitarian.

Latest from Anthony J Wallace

‘It’s creating a new normal’: A Navajo school district and its students fight to overcome amid COVID-19

PIÑON – Even in the best of times, Native American K-12 students have faced an uphill battle to getting a high school diploma. Now COVID has brought new challenges, but one district is doing everything it can to help its students persevere.


Pandemic shines light on complex coexistence of modern times, traditional ways on Navajo Nation

PHOENIX – People went to medicine men in Indian Country for help, exposing them to the virus and tensions between modern medicine and traditional ways.


Blue wave in the Grand Canyon State: Biden, Kelly projected winners as Arizona takes center stage in 2020

PHOENIX – Amid a pandemic that changed the way Americans live and vote, Joe Biden was called the winner over Donald Trump in Arizona, leading a blue wave that flipped the longtime Republic stronghold to a Democratic presidential candidate for only the second time since 1952.


As COVID adds hours and challenges, teachers look to Proposition 208 for more school funding

Teachers say a proposal to increase funding to schools is especially vital amid the pandemic, but opponents worry about the effect on small businesses.


The ununited state of juvenile justice in America

As a child in the United States, justice depends on where you live, the color of your skin, which police officer arrests you, or which judge, prosecutor or probation officer happens to be involved in the case. Juvenile courts across the country processed nearly 750,000 in 2018 and about 200,000 of these were removed from home and locked away.


Ahead of ‘public charge’ change, advocates struggle to keep Hispanic families enrolled in benefits

PHOENIX – Advocates continue struggling to keep qualified Hispanic families enrolled in public programs like food stamps and cash assistance amid changes to the so-called public charge rule. The U.S. Supreme Court last month decided to let the rule take effect, and that happens on Feb. 24. It allows immigration officers to consider applicants’ use of public benefits, including Medicaid, in deciding to grant green cards, visas and changes in residency.