Health

Arizona files lawsuit against Chandler-based opioid company, accuses it of fraudulent practices

PHOENIX – Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against Chandler-based opioid manufacturer Insys Therapeutics Inc. and three doctors. The suit alleged that they participated in fraudulent practices, which led to overprescription of a powerful opioid drug, according to a statement released Thursday.


Native American tribes fight for clean water and more money

CROW AGENCY, Mont. – When John Doyle first noticed signs of trouble in the Little Bighorn River, he was still a young member of the Apsaalooke Nation in southeastern Montana.

man looks towards water

Shane Doan inspired growth of Arizona hockey community

PHOENIX — After Coyotes forward Shane Doan announced his retirement in a letter to the team and his fans, members of the Arizona hockey community reflected on the impact he had on the sport locally.


Colonias on the border struggle with decades-old water issues

YUMA, Ariz. – Nestor Alaniz didn’t get a permit to build a well in his mother’s backyard, and he didn’t get it inspected.

woman in car

Industrial waste pollutes America’s drinking water

PHOENIX – In Ringwood, New Jersey, Ford Motor Co. dumped more than 35,000 tons of toxic paint sludge onto lands occupied for centuries by the Turtle Clan of the Ramapough Lenape tribe, poisoning groundwater with arsenic, lead and other harmful chemicals.

Industrial view

Farming activity contaminates water despite best practices

CASCO, Wisc. – Lynda Cochart did not realize her water was contaminated with coliform bacteria until she contracted MRSA, an antibiotic-resistant skin infection. She believed it came from the water in her well in Casco, Wisconsin. “There’s no other way I could have gotten it,” she said.

Farmer handline water pipe.

Schools fail lead tests while many states don’t require testing at all

WASHINGTON, D.C. – When Ceon Dubose Palmore got thirsty at school, an administrator had to escort the 15-year-old past trash-bag-covered fountains to a faucet two floors down.


Millions consumed potentially unsafe water in the past 10 years

WOLFFORTH, Texas – As many as 63 million people – nearly a fifth of the country – from rural central California to the boroughs of New York City, were exposed to potentially unsafe water more than once during the past decade, according to a News21 investigation of 680,000 water quality and monitoring violations from the Environmental Protection Agency.


Military bases’ contamination will affect water for generations

VICTORVILLE, Calif. - Once a fighter jet training base critical to the Cold War, little remains of the former George Air Force Base but rows of dilapidated houses, a dismantled military hospital and dangerous chemicals from pesticides, jet fuels and other hazardous wastes that have poisoned the water for decades.

Base Operations Building

Hallucinations, cramps, even death: Sports in Arizona heat can be dangerous

PHOENIX — Exercising in the Arizona heat can be a dangerous -- and mind-altering -- decision.


Great deals drive golfers to feel the heat on Valley courses

PHOENIX -- With a floppy hat on her head and sunblock in hand, Viv Hynes prepares to play a round at the TPC Scottsdale golf club.


‘Hard choices’ at VA include possible cut to unemployability benefit

WASHINGTON - Faced with a "hard decision" on the budget, the Department of Veterans Affairs is again considering new limits on the Individual Unemployability benefit that currently helps more than 200,000 disabled veterans.

VA Chief