New report shows Arizona children’s well-being improves slightly but state still ranks among the worst

PHOENIX – An annual report that measures the well-being of children shows slight improvement for Arizona kids, but it also raises child care concerns.

Founded by Joseph Ignacio Flores, Academia Del Pueblo is a kindergarten through eighth grade school that offers an early childhood center. Photo taken Tuesday, June 13, 2023. (Photo by Sophia Biazus/Cronkite News)

Activist on a roll: ADA lawsuits no surprise to disabled community advocate

PHOENIX – Two Southwest-based eye surgery centers reached a $1 million settlement with the Justice Department, which accused them of discriminating against disabled patients, a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Disability activist Gina Schuh has used a wheelchair since a diving accident at age 18. “When people tell me not to let it define me, I say, ‘Actually, it 100% has defined me as a person and who I am today and I am cool with it.'” (Photo courtesy of Gina Schuh)

New Phoenix medical center to provide health care to people who are blind or visually impaired

PHOENIX – The Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired and Terros Health will work together to have members of the program and surrounding community get access to health care. The new center is scheduled to open this summer.

Kathy Zwald, an orientation mobility specialist, demonstrates a screen magnifier used by people who are visually challenged. Photo taken on April 12, 2023. (Photo by Izabella Hernandez/Cronkite News)

Fighting the heat: Arizona officials petitioning for federal aid in extreme heat situations

PHOENIX – Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and Rep. Ruben Gallego are petitioning for FEMA to declare extreme heat a major disaster and taking measures to curb the number of heat-related deaths in Arizona.

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego and Rep. Ruben Gallego address media questions on the proposed Excess Urban Heat Mitigation Act outside Phoenix City Hall. (Photo by Josh Bootzin/Cronkite News)

Mayes: Ruling dropping preventive drugs from insurance would be devastating

WASHINGTON - Arizona Attorney General Kris Mayes vowed Thursday to "fight like heck" against a federal court ruling that could overturn a mandate that health insurers provide HIV-preventive medication without charge.


State legislators host town hall on guardianship abuses and hear brutal realities of probate court

PHOENIX – Legislators outline a proposed bill that would provide healthier methods of guardianship in a town hall meeting at Arizona State University’s downtown Phoenix campus.

State legislators and disability advocates attend a legislative town hall to discuss Arizona’s guardianship process and offer alternatives for consideration in the next legislative session. (Photo by Evelin Ruelas/Cronkite News)

Blacks more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease, less likely to be treated

PHOENIX - Black Americans are twice as likely as whites to develop Alzheimer’s disease and live with missed diagnoses and treatment gaps, studies reveal. While 10% of white adults have the disease, 19% of U.S. Black adults do, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.


From toilets to mattresses: Arizona officials warn motorists to “Secure Your Load” to prevent road debris

PHOENIX – Arizona safety officials say road debris is dangerous: The region saw more than 800 debris-related crashes last year, Maricopa County Supervisor Jack Sellers said. Gov. Katie Hobbs declared June 6 Arizona’s “Secure Your Load Day.”

Mesa Police Officer Sean Stoddard had a near-death experience while cleaning up road debris. His vehicle’s entire back end was crushed. (Photo By Evelin Ruelas/Cronkite News)

Study: Phoenix faces health crisis if heatwave, blackout hit at same time

WASHINGTON - Thousands would die, and hundreds of thousands would need emergency medical care if a blackout hit Phoenix at the same time as a multiday heat wave, a recent study says. But Valley officials say they plan for heat, and chances of those events coinciding are remote.


Eating disorders marked by diagnosis, treatment gap for men, women of color

PHOENIX – Mental health experts are finding it harder to diagnose eating disorders in men because of the lack of clinical research.

(Illustration by Emily Mai/Cronkite News)

Doctors, shelters stitch medical care help for El Paso migrants

EL PASO, Texas – A humanitarian matchup of medical, shelter and government workers reach out to try to help some of the thousands of migrants who cross into El Paso from its municipal twin, Ciudad Juárez in Chihuahua, Mexico. El Paso city officials estimate that an average 250 people daily – up to 1,000 daily during surges – make their way from half a dozen countries, mainly from South America.

A migrant waits in the intake room before being taken into an exam room at a clinic in El Paso. Advocates say hope and faith is a common denominator among migrants who leave home and make their way through hardships on their journey to the U.S. (Photo by Paula Soria/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University plans new medical school among efforts to address gaps in state health care

TEMPE – The Arizona Board of Regents asked Arizona’s three universities to create real-world solutions to the state’s health care crisis. ASU responded with plans for ASU Health, which includes a new medical school focused on medical engineering and technology.

ASU President Michael Crow, left, and Fred DuVal, chair elect of the Arizona Board of Regents, confer after the regents meeting where Crow announced a new medical school on Thursday, June 1, 2023. (Photo by Sophia Biazus/Cronkite News)