Search result for Agnel Philip and Emily Mahoney

Arizona’s indigenous women led the Phoenix Women’s March

PHOENIX – At the head of this years Phoenix Women’s March were indigenous women bringing awareness to missing and murdered native women.


Asian-Americans working to make their voices heard in Arizona

PHOENIX - The Asian population in the U.S. has grown faster than any major ethnic or racial group in the past 15 years but in Arizona, where they account for just 3.5 percent of the population, it can be easy to be overlooked. But a group of advocates is out to change that.


New fellowships help train doctors in battle against drug addictions

PHOENIX – The opioid crisis has underscored the shortage of U.S. doctors trained in addiction medicine, but two new Arizona fellowships hope to encourage more doctors to enter the field.


Food insecurity a challenge for nearly half of college students in the U.S.

SANTA MONICA, Calif. – According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 48 percent of college students in 2016 reported food insecurity. Some universities, including Arizona State University and Santa Monica College in California, have programs to help.


New houses, built to fire code, burned down anyway in California’s 2017 Thomas Fire

LOS ANGELES – California's building codes are not keeping up with the severe, wind-driven wildfires that are becoming the norm.


Alzheimer’s disease also upends the finances and lives of those caring for patients

PHOENIX – More than 14 million people are expected to have Alzheimer’s by 2050, but the brain disease affects people of all ages as caregivers grapple with the social and financial costs of a devastating diagnosis.


A battle beneath the waves: Purple urchins thrive, starving out red urchins used in sushi

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. – Red sea urchins are harvested for their gonads, which are eaten as a sushi delicacy known as uni. Climate change has led to an increase in the purple sea urchin population, which is out-competing the red sea urchins for food.


Why llamas may be the key to help humans fight off the flu

LA JOLLA, Calif. – A recent study examines how llama antibodies may be the key to combating the influenza virus. Scientists at California’s Scripps Research Institute have found that mice, given fatal doses of flu strains, successfully fought them off.


More endangered California condors soon will soar above Pinnacles National Park

SOLEDAD, Calif. – The number of California condors has steadily grown over the past 30 years, from 22 left in the wild to about 500 now. Through recovery programs and collaborations in California, Arizona and Idaho, along with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, endangered California condors are bred in captivity and released into the wild. In December, three birds will be freed at Pinnacles National Park.


Scottsdale firefighters pitch in to battle Woolsey Fire near LA

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif. – The Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management has sent more than 160 Arizona firefighters to Southern California to help contain the Woolsey Fire. Capt. Al DiBenedetto with the Scottsdale Fire Department and three crew members are working in the hills and the mountains in Ventura and Los Angeles counties.


Despite slight drop, Arizona still leads nation in women officeholders

WASHINGTON - Despite a record number of women running for office this year, Arizona will actually lose one female elected official when congressional and legislative delegations take office in January, but the state still leads most of the rest of the nation when it comes to electing women.


Why do we keep building in fire-prone areas? Money is one reason

YORBA LINDA, Calif. – Despite the growing risk of disastrous wildfires in Southern California, thousands of homes are being built in areas that are prone to burning. A proposed development near Yorba Linda offers a look at how such housing projects get approved, and how taxpayers ultimately are on the hook.