Search result for Laura Sposato and Courtland Jeffrey

Court: Higher water charge for public housing is not discriminatory

WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court said Friday that an Arizona water district can charge more in upfront fees to public housing residents, even though the policy disproportionately affects minority customers and single mothers.


Q&A: Navajo woman starts nonprofit to improve maternal health

PHOENIX – The U.S. faces higher rates of pregnancy-related deaths than other developed nations, and Indigenous mothers are 2 to 3 times as likely to die as white mothers. One nonprofit aims to help.


Can you hear me now? Centrist positioning makes Sinema a player, pariah

WASHINGTON - Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's refusal to back the Biden administration's $3.5 trillion social and clean-energy spending package has made her a target for Democrats - and possibly "the most powerful person in Washington right now," one analyst said.


Q&A: How a brother’s drug overdose led to one woman’s crusade for harm reduction

PHOENIX – Amid rising opioid overdoses, needle exchange programs now are legal in Arizona. An advocate for one program talks about her work and how such efforts combat addiction and deaths.


As COVID-19 pandemic wears on, demand increases for deworming drug ivermectin

Prescriptions for the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin to treat COVID-19 are increasing, and one Phoenix feed store has struggled to stock the medication, which in some forms is used to deworm large animals.


Essential but ignored: How day care powered the pandemic workforce

The pandemic exposed how vulnerable and essential child care providers are in America. The median hourly wage is $10.31, and most workers receive no benefits, but they play a crucial role in getting people back to work.


Solutions and struggle: COVID relief highlights complexity of issues facing Native people

The pandemic exacerbated different infrastructure issues in Indigenous communities across the country.


Medical mistreatment, inequity lead to vaccine hesitancy for Black Americans

Historic and ongoing medical mistreatment and lack of access have informed Black Americans’ COVID-19 response: vaccine hesitancy.


Sonoran scientists start group for Latin American women in conservation fields

Women are increasingly finding a space in the male-dominated field of environmental conservation. But there are still significant barriers – from harassment to language hurdles – keeping their work in the shadows.


Shipping sage and praying on Zoom: How an Indigenous healing practice survived the pandemic

PHOENIX – For centuries, Native Americans have used talking circles to solve problems and provide healing. During the pandemic, these practices moved online and outdoors to help those in need.


Phoenix police keep tabs on social media, but who keeps tabs on cops?

PHOENIX - Police took to monitoring activists' social media in a year that saw Black Lives Matter rallies, anti-lockdown events, election protests and the Capitol riot - but experts worry that many agencies are operating under barebones surveillance guidelines.


Initial response strong to special Affordable Care Act open enrollment

WASHINGTON - A special open enrollment period for Affordable Care Act coverage drew 528,005 new enrollees nationwide in its first six weeks, with 9,569 of those consumers in Arizona, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.